IELTS Academic Reading: Cambridge 15 Test 1 Reading passage 2; Driverless cars; with best solutions and top explanations

IELTS Academic Reading: Cambridge 15 Test 1 Reading passage 2; Driverless cars; with best solutions and top explanations

This Academic IELTS Reading post focuses on solutions to IELTS Cambridge 15 Reading Test 1 Reading Passage 2 entitled ‘Driverless cars. This is a targeted post for IELTS candidates who have major problems finding out and understanding Reading Answers in the AC module. This post can guide you the best to understand every Reading answer without much trouble. Finding out IELTS Reading answers is a steady process, and this post will assist you in this respect.

IELTS Cambridge 15 Test 1: AC Reading Module

Reading Passage 2: Questions 14-26

The headline of the passage: Driverless cars

Questions 14-19: Identifying information

[This question asks you to find information from the passage and write the number of the paragraph (A, B, C or D … .. ) in the answer sheet. Now, if the question is given in the very first part of the question set, I’d request you not to answer them first. It’s because this question will not follow any sequence, and so it will surely kill your time. Rather, you should answer all the other questions of the passage first. And just like List of Headings, only read the first two lines or last two lines of the expected paragraph initially. If you find the answers, you need not read the middle part. If you don’t find answers yet, you can skim the middle part of the paragraph. Keywords will be a useful matter here.]

Question no. 14: reference to the amount of time when a car is not in use

Keywords for the question: amount of time, car, not in use,   

The answer to this question can be found in line no. 3 of paragraph C. The author says here, “ .. . .. At present, the average car spends more than 90 percent of its life parked. . ..”

Here, 90 percent of its life = amount of time, parked = car not in use,

So, the answer is: C

Question no. 15: mention of several advantages of driverless vehicles for individual road-users

Keywords for the question: several advantages, driverless vehicles, individual road-users,

Section B describes some advantages of driverless vehicles for the road-users.

In the first paragraph of section B, the author says in lines 3-5, “ . . .. . more than 90 percent of road collisions involve human error as a contributory factor, and it is the primary cause in the vast majority. Automation may help to reduce the incidence of this.”

Here, Automation = driverless vehicles,  

This means driverless vehicles can reduce road collisions, or, road accidents.

Again, in the second paragraph of the same section, the author says in lines 1-4, “Another aim is to free the time people spend driving for other purposes. If the vehicle can do some or all of the driving, it may be possible to be productive, to socialise or simply to relax while automation systems have responsibility for safe control of the vehicle. . .. .”

This means driverless vehicles can save time that people spend driving for other productive works, or, relaxation.

So, the answer is: B

Question no. 16: reference to the opportunity of choosing the most appropriate vehicle for each trip

Keywords for the question: opportunity of choosing, most appropriate vehicle, each trip,  

The first paragraph of section E says, “Automation may prompt other changes in vehicle manufacture. If we move to a model where consumers are tending not to own a single vehicle but to purchase access to a range of vehicles through a mobility provider, drivers will have the freedom to select one that best suits their needs for a particular journey, rather than making a compromise across all their requirements.” 

The paragraph suggests that automation, or, driverless vehicles provide the opportunity to select appropriate vehicles for different trips.

So, the answer is: E

Question no. 17: an estimate of how long it will take to overcome a number of problems

Keywords for the question: estimate, how long, take to overcome, a number of problems,  

The first two lines of section G give us the answer to this question. The author writes here, “It’s clear that there are many challenges that need to be addressed but, through robust and targeted research, these can most probably be conquered within the next 10 years.  . . …”

Here, many challenges = a number of problems, within the next 10 years =  how long it will take to overcome,

So, the answer is: G

Question no. 18: a suggestion that the use of driverless cars may have no effect on the number of vehicles manufactured

Keywords for the question: use of driverless cars, may have, no effect, number of vehicles, manufactured,  

The second paragraph of section D says, “Modelling work by the University of Michigan Transportation Research Institute suggests automated vehicles might reduce vehicle ownership by 43 percent, but that vehicle’s average annual mileage would double as a result. As a consequence, each vehicle would be used more intensively, and might need replacing sooner. This faster rate of turnover may mean that vehicle production will not necessarily decrease.”

The paragraph, especially, the last lines, suggests that the use of automated vehicles, or, driverless cars may not affect the number of vehicles manufactured.

So, the answer is: D

Questions 19-22: Summary completion:

[In this kind of question candidates are given a summary for one, two or three paragraphs with some fill in the blanks questions. Candidates need to find out the related paragraphs by correctly studying the keywords form the questions. Then, they should follow the steps of finding answers for fill in the gaps.]

Title of the summary: The impact of driverless cars

Question no. 19: Figures from the Transport Research Laboratory indicate that most motor accidents are partly due to __________, so the introduction of driverless vehicles will result in greater safety.

Keywords for the question: Figures, the Transport Research Laboratory, most motor accidents, partly due to, so, introduction of driverless vehicles, result in, greater safety,  

The answer can be found in Section B, in the first paragraph. Look at these lines carefully, “ . .. . One frequently cited motive is safety; indeed, research at the UK’s Transport Research Laboratory has demonstrated that more than 90 percent of road collisions involve human error as a contributory factor, . . .. . .”

Here, more than 90 percent of road collisions = most motor accidents,

So, the answer is: human error

Question no. 20: In addition to the direct benefits of automation, it may bring other advantages. For example, schemes for __________ will be more workable, especially in towns and cities, resulting in fewer cars on the road.  

Keywords for the question: in addition to, direct benefits, automation, other advantages, schemes, will be, more workable, especially, towns and cities, resulting in, fewer cars on the road,  

The answer to this question can be found in section C. Here, in lines 3-7, the writer states, “ . .. . At present, the average car spends more than 90 percent of its life parked. Automation means that initiatives for car-sharing become much more viable, particularly in urban areas with significant travel demand. If a significant proportion of the population choose to use shared automated vehicles, mobility demand can be met by far fewer vehicles.”

Here, initiatives = schemes, much more viable = more workable, particularly in urban areas = especially in towns and cities, far fewer vehicles = fewer cars on the road,

So, the answer is: car sharing / car-sharing

Question no. 21: According to the University of Michigan Transportation Research Institute, there could be a 43 percent drop in _________ of cars.

Keywords for the question: University of Michigan Transportation Research Institute, could be, 43 percent drop,

In section D, take a close look at paragraph no. 2. Here, the author of this passage writes in lines 1-2, “. .. Modelling work by the University of Michigan Transportation Research Institute suggests automated vehicles might reduce vehicle ownership by 43 percent, . .. . .”

Here, reduce = drop, vehicle = car,

So, the answer is: ownership

Question no. 22: However, this would mean that the yearly ________ of each car would, on average, be twice as high as it currently is. This would lead to a higher turnover of vehicles, and therefore no reduction in automotive manufacturing.

Keywords for the question: would mean, yearly, each car, on average, twice as high, would lead to, higher turnover, no reduction, automotive manufacturing,

Line no. 3 of paragraph no. 2 in section D says, “ . . .. but that vehicles’ average annual mileage would double as a result. .. .”

Here, but = however, annual = yearly, double = twice,

So, the answer is: mileage

Questions 23-26: Choosing TWO options from the given list

[In this kind of question, candidates have to choose two or three answers for each question from five or six options. The answers will not follow any sequential order as they are randomly spread in the text, so this question will be time-consuming. Skimming will come handy and previous reading of the text can come in use. Therefore, other questions should be done first before answering this question.]

Question no. 23 & 24: Which TWO benefits of automated vehicles does the writer mention?  

Keywords for the question: TWO benefits, automated vehicles,    

Section B of the passage talks in detail about the benefits of automation, or, driverless cars. Let’s have a look there again. In section B, let’s read the second paragraph. “Another aim is to free the time people spend driving for other purposes. If the vehicle can do some or all of the driving, it may be possible to be productive, to socialise or simply to relax while automation systems have responsibility for safe control of the vehicle. If the vehicle can do the driving, those who are challenged by existing mobility models – such as older or disabled travellers – may be able to enjoy significantly greater travel autonomy.”

Here, it may be possible to be productive, to socialise or simply to relax while automation systems have responsibility for safe control of the vehicle = Travellers could spend journeys doing something other than driving,

And,

those who are challenged by existing mobility models – such as older or disabled travellers – may be able to enjoy significantly greater travel autonomy = People who find driving physically difficult could travel independently,

So, the answers are:

  1. C (Travellers could spend journeys doing something other than driving.)
  2. D (People who find driving physically difficult could travel independently.)

Question no. 25 & 26: Which TWO challenges to automated vehicle development does the writer mention?

Keywords for the question: TWO challenges, automated vehicle development,

Section F discusses the challenges of automated vehicle development. Let’s read the section.

“There are a number of hurdles to overcome in delivering automated vehicles to our roads. These include the technical difficulties in ensuring that the vehicle works reliably in the infinite range of traffic, weather and road situations it might encounter,  . .. . . . . . and the societal changes that may be required for communities to trust and accept automated vehicles as being a valuable part of the mobility landscape.”

Here, hurdles = challenges,

ensuring that the vehicle works reliably in the infinite range of traffic, weather and road situations it might encounter = getting automated vehicles to adapt to various different driving conditions,

And, the societal changes that may be required for communities to trust and accept automated vehicles = making sure the general public has confidence in automated vehicles,

So, the answers are:

  1. A (making sure the general public has confidence in automated vehicles)
  2. E (getting automated vehicles to adapt to various different driving conditions)

Here’s a video lesson on the solutions of this passage:

Click here for solutions to Cambridge 15 AC Test 1 Reading Passage 1

Click here for solutions to Cambridge 15 AC Test 1 Reading Passage 3

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