IELTS Academic Reading: Cambridge 6, Test 2, Reading Passage 3: Numeration; with best solutions and detailed explanations

IELTS Academic Reading: Cambridge 6, Test 2, Reading Passage 3: Numeration; with best solutions and detailed explanations

This Academic IELTS Reading post focuses on solutions to IELTS Cambridge 6 Reading Test 2 Reading Passage 3 entitled ‘Numeration’. This is a targeted post for IELTS candidates who have big problems finding out and understanding Reading Answers in the AC module. This post can guide you the best to understand every Reading answer without much trouble. Finding out IELTS Reading answers is a steady process, and this post will assist you in this respect.

IELTS Cambridge 6 Test 2: AC Reading Module

Reading Passage 3:

The headline of the passage: Numeration

Questions 27-31: Completing/Matching sentences with correct endings:

[For this type of question, candidates need to match the beginning and end of sentences. Candidates need to look for keywords in the sentence-beginnings and find the relative paragraphs and then sentences in the passage. Skimming and scanning, both reading skills are essential for this question-type.]

Question no. 27: A developed system of numbering –

Keywords for the question: developed system, numbering,

In paragraph no. 2, the writer mentions the reason for the need of a developed system of numbering. In line no. 3 take a look at the phrase ‘our ancestors’. Then in lines 7-8, the writer says, “. . . . As they began to settle, grow plants and herd animals, the need for a sophisticated number system became paramount. … .”

Here, they (our ancestors) = people, to settle, grow plants and herd animals = began farming, sophisticated number system = developed system of numbering,

So, the answer is: B (was necessary when people began farming.)

Question no. 28: An additional hand signal –

Keywords for the question: additional, hand signal, 

Paragraph no. 3 highlights the use of hand signals and discusses some types of hand signals first. Then, in lines 5-8 the writer explains, “ . ..  For example, when using the one, two, many types of system, the word many would mean, ‘Look at my hands and see how many fingers I am showing you’. This basic approach is limited in the range of numbers that it can express, but this range will generally suffice when dealing with the simpler aspects of human existence.

Here, the one, two, many types of system = additional hand signal, limited in the range of numbers = range of number word was restricted,

So, the answer is: E (was used when the range of number words was restricted.)

Question no. 29: In seventh-century Europe, the ability to count to a certain number –

Keywords for the question: seventh-century, Europe, ability, count, certain number,  

The answer can be found in paragraph no. 4 where the keywords ‘seventh-century’ and ‘Europe’ can be found. In lines 6-8 the author says, “ . .. The average person in the seventh century in Europe was not as familiar with numbers as we are today. In fact, to qualify as a witness in a court of law a man had to be able to count to nine!”

Here, to qualify as a witness in a court of law = to fulfill a civic role, had to be able to = was necessary,

So, the answer is: A (was necessary in order to fulfill a civic role.)

Question no. 30: Thinking about numbers as concepts separate from physical objects –

Keywords for the question: thinking, numbers, concepts, separate from, physical objects,   

The answer is in paragraph no.5. First, the writer says in the beginning of the paragraph, “Perhaps the most fundamental step in developing a sense of number is not the ability to count, but rather to see that a number is really an abstract idea instead of a simple attachment to a group of particular objects.”

Here, an abstract idea = concepts, group of particular objects = physical objects,

Then, in the final lines of paragraph no. 5, the writer says, “… .. . When the number 4 can be registered in the mind as a specific word, independent of the object being referenced, the individual is ready to take the first step toward the development of a notational system for numbers and, from there, to arithmetic.”

Here, the first step toward the development of a notational system for numbers and, from there, to arithmetic = development of arithmetic,

So, the answer is: C (was necessary for the development of arithmetic.)

Question no. 31: Expressing number differently according to class of item –

Keywords for the question: expressing number, differently, according to, class of item,

The writer says in paragraph no. 6, “ .. . . Traces of the very first stages in the development of numeration can be seen in several living languages today. The numeration system of the Tsimshian language in British Columbia contains seven distinct sets of words for numbers according to the class of the item being counted: for counting flat objects and animals, for round objects and time, for people, for long objects and trees, for canoes, for measures, and for counting when no particular object is being numerated. .. . ..”  

Here, Traces of the very first stages in the development of numeration = characteristics of early numeration systems,  

So, the answer is: G (was a characteristic of early numeration systems.)

Questions 32-40: TRUE, FALSE, NOT GIVEN

[In this type of question, candidates are asked to find out whether:

The statement in the question agrees with the information in the passage – TRUE

The statement in the question contradicts with the information in the passage – FALSE

If there is no information on this  – NOT GIVEN

For this type of question, you can divide each statement into three independent pieces and make your way through with the answer.]

Question no. 32: For the earliest tribes, the concept of sufficiency was more important than the concept of quantity.

Keywords for the question: earliest tribes, sufficiency, more important, than, quantity,

Let’s read the second paragraph. The author mentions here in lines 2-4, “ . .. Even the earliest of tribes had a system of numeration that, if not advanced, was sufficient for the tasks that they had to perform. Our ancestors had little use for actual numbers; . . . .”

Here, was sufficient for the tasks that they had to perform = the concept of sufficiency was more important, Our ancestors had little use for actual numbers = the concept of quantity was less important,

So, the answer is: TRUE

Question no. 33: Indigenous Tasmanians used only four terms to indicate numbers of objects.

Keywords for the question: Indigenous Tasmanians, used, only four terms, indicate, numbers of objects,

The answer can be traced in lines 1-2 of paragraph no. 3, “ . .. The indigenous peoples of Tasmania were only able to count one, two, many; . .. .”

Here, The indigenous peoples of Tasmania = Indigenous Tasmanians, able to count = used, one, two, many = three terms,

So, the answer is: FALSE

Question no. 34: Some peoples with simple number systems use body language to prevent misunderstanding of expressions of number.

Keywords for the question: some people, simple number systems, use, body language, to prevent, misunderstanding, expressions of number,

Again, in the third paragraph, lines 3-4 say, “ . . . But in real situations, the number and words are often accompanied by gestures to help resolve any confusion. . .. .”

Here, often accompanied by gestures = use body languages, resolve any confusion = prevent misunderstanding of expressions,

So, the answer is: TRUE

Question no. 35: All cultures have been able to express large numbers clearly.

Keywords for the question: all cultures, have been able, to express, large numbers, clearly, 

The writer says in paragraph no. 4 in line no. 1, “The lack of ability of some cultures to deal with large numbers is not really surprising. .. . …”

Here, lack of ability of some cultures to deal with large numbers = Not all cultures have been able to express large numbers clearly,

So, the answer is: FALSE

Question no. 36: The word ‘thousand’ has Anglo-Saxon origins.

Keywords for the question: word ‘thousand’, Anglo-Saxon origins,    

The author talks about the Anglo-Saxon language in paragraph no. 4 providing a list of words and their origins. We can find only the numbers 10 and 100, but there is no discussion about the origin of the number ‘thousand’.  

So, the answer is: NOT GIVEN

Question no. 37: In general, people in seventh-century Europe had poor counting ability.

Keywords for the question: in general, people, seventh-century, Europe, poor counting ability,   

At the end of paragraph no. 4 the writer says, “ . .. The average person in the seventh century in Europe was not as familiar with numbers as we are today. .. ..”

Here, The average person in the seventh century = In general, people in seventh-century Europe, not as familiar with numbers = poor counting ability,

So, the answer is: TRUE

Question no. 38: In the Tsimshian language, the number for long objects and canoes is expressed with the same word.

Keywords for the question: Tsimshian language, number for long objects, canoes, expressed, same word,     

The answer can be found in paragraph no. 6. The writer says here in lines 2-5, “. . .. The numeration system of the Tsimshian language in British Columbia contains seven distinct sets of words for numbers according to the class of the item being counted: for counting flat objects and animals, for round objects and time, for people, for long objects and trees, for canoes, for measures, and for counting when no particular object is being numerated.… .. ..”

Here, seven distinct sets of words = not same words,

So, the answer is: FALSE

Question no. 39: The Tsimshian language contains both older and newer systems of counting.

Keywords for the question: Tsimshian language, contains, both older and newer systems, counting,

After the information about listing seven distinct sets of words for numbers according to the class of item in the Tsimshian language, the author says in lines 6-7, “It seems that the last is a later development while the first six groups show the relics of an older system.” 

This means the Tsimshian language has both old and new systems for counting.

So, the answer is: TRUE

Question no. 40: Early peoples found it easier to count by using their fingers rather than a group of pebbles.

Keywords for the question: early peoples, found, easier, to count, using, fingers, rather than, group of pebbles,    

In the final paragraph, the author mentions in lines 2-3, “ . .. . it is possible to count by matching the items being counted against a group of pebbles, grains of corn, or the counter’s fingers. .. ..”

However, there is no mention regarding whether early people found it easier to count by using their fingers or a group of pebbles.

So, the answer is: NOT GIVEN

Click here for solutions to Cambridge 6 Test 2 Reading Passage 1

Click here for solutions to Cambridge 6 Test 2 Reading Passage 2

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